Harvey Park South

Neighborhood Profile: Harvey Park South

Harvey Park South History:

Forty-five acres of the Harvey Park South area were first purchased in 1890 for the St. Mary’s Academy. The Catholic girls’ school was run by the Sisters of Loretto and had outgrown its previous location. The school was a five-story, 186 room, Romanesque-style Building. The Sisters almost lost the property in the silver crash of 1893. Mother Praxedes Carty persuaded the mortgage holders to extend the loan, and the school was not only saved but prospered in the coming decades.

Fair Hill farms were the other prominent property in the region. West of St. Mary’s, owner John Flower planted lush gardens, built multiple barns, and had an orchard with many fruit trees. He sold the property to a U.S. Navy Commander who, in-turn, sold it to Herbert C. Stebbins in 1942. Stebbins and his daughter restored the run-down property and named the land Hillcroft. For ten years they ran a small farm and raised varying small livestock. During this time the Catholic school became Loretto Heights College, a four-year women’s college. Herbert Stebbins made a deal with Loretto Heights College to sell the property to them upon his death.

A majority of the neighborhood was untouched until the mid-twentieth century. In 1958 the land was annexed to Denver. During this time the city saw a large increase in population as GI’s were returning from war. The first development platted during this time was Sharon Park. Soon new subdivisions were popping up to the west of the college. Because the neighborhood of Harvey Park to the north was almost fully developed this new area was commonly referred to as Harvey Park South.

By 1960 the neighborhood seemed mostly built-out, yet numerous parcels both large and small remained vacant. Today, high-density apartments have been built on some of those parcels. Others, totaling about 100 acres, remain undeveloped.

Harvey Park South Today:

Harvey Park South is a quiet neighborhood with a suburban feel. A majority of the homes are mid-century brick, ranch-style homes. The community is home to mostly long-time residents and families.

HARVEY PARK SOUTH

Where:
Harvey Park is bounded by W. Yale Avenue to the north, U.S. Highway 285 to the south, S. Sheridan Boulevard to the west and S. Federal Boulevard to the east.

Who Lives There:
The population is 45% married, 32% single and 29% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 18.29%.

Retail Areas:
Sheridan Blvd.
Hampden Ave.
Federal Blvd.

Median Sales Price:
$342,500 for a single-family residence (2017)

Main Attractions:
Strong community involvement and outreach

Common Complaints:
Grafitti and tagging on buildings

Schools:
Sabin Elementary School
DSST: College View Middle School and High School
Colorado Heights University
Gust Elementary School

Local Parks:
Loretto Heights Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Buses servicing neighborhood: 27 (W. Yale Ave./ Raleigh St./ Federal Blvd.), 30, 30C (Lowell Blvd.), 50, 51 (Sheridan Blvd.) and 29, 36, 36L (Federal Blvd.)

Shared lane bicycle routes: D20 (W. Yale Ave.), D1 (S. Raleigh St.), D3 and D22-A (S. Lowell Blvd./ Knox Ct.) and W. Bates Ave. D22 is a bike lane running W. Dartmouth Ave.

Art Venues and Annual Events:
Harvey Park Improvement Association: http://www.harveypark.org


Sharon R. Catlett.
Farmlands, Forts & Country Life: The Story of Southwest Denver

Published by Big Earth Publishing, Boulder, CO.
2007. Print.

“Harvey Park South”
Community Facts: Neighborhood Summaries
http://denvermetrodata.org/neighborhood/harvey-park-south
Copyright 1998, The Piton Foundation. Web.8/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

Central Park

StapletonNeighborhood Profile: Central Park

Central Park History:

Central Park, (formerly Stapleton) located seven miles outside of downtown Denver, was originally known as Sand Creek or Rattlesnake Hollow. In the early 1920s, the aviation industry was steadily growing in Denver. Mayor Benjamin Stapleton wanted to build a local airport to centralize this growth. The mayor secured Charles Vail, the manager of the Improvements and Parks Department, to help oversee the development. Ultimately the pair chose Rattlesnake Hollow as the best location.

The airport met with resistance from locals right from the start. Many Denver residents were worried about the costs of such a huge commercial venture. Even with the opposition, the airport opened in October 1929 and was named Denver Municipal Airport (DMA.) In its first year, DMA turned a profit and over the next decade, it would steadily grow.

After World War II the number of people flying commercially grew exponentially. DMA grew as well and in 1944 was renamed Stapleton Airfield in honor of the current mayor. Over the next several decades the airport would continue to expand. The original 640 acres of land increased to over 4,00o acres. By 1961 Stapleton was ranked third in the country for total aircraft operations. Soon, the airport was renamed, again, as Stapleton International Airport.

In the 1980’s Stapleton International Airport was outgrowing its location. With an increased demand for national and international air traffic and the size of new aircraft, the airport needed more land to expand. A new airport was built further east and Stapleton International Airport closed in February of 1995. Six years later the city began redevelopment of the land for new housing with a mixed-development community.

Today:

Denver’s continuous growth has made the redevelopment of Central Park essential. Three thousand acres are being developed with 4,000 apartments, 8,000 houses and 2 million square feet of retail space. Over 1,000 acres are designated for parks and open space. When all construction is complete in 2020, Stapleton will house up to 30,000 people.

Where:
Central Park is bounded by E. 56th Ave./ Wildlife Drive to the north, Montview Boulevard/ E. 26th Ave. to the south, Quebec Street to the west and Havana St./ Lima St. to the east.

Who Lives There:
The population is 52% married, 32% single and 53% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 26.58%

Retail Areas:
Quebec Street
36th Avenue
29th Avenue
Syracuse Street
Yosemite Street
Northfield Blvd.

Median Sales Price:
$538,450 (2017): $382,500 for a condo/ townhouse, $630,775 for a single family residence.

Main Attractions:
There are close to 50 parks in the neighborhood, three public swimming pools and great mass transit, including the RTD light rail.

Common Complaints:
Heavy traffic through the center of the neighborhood. Central Park Boulevard is a straight shot from the new I-70 exit down to Montview.

Schools:
William Roberts Elementary School, Isabella Bird Community School, Swigert International School, Denver School of Science & Technology, Montessori Children’s House of Denver, Westerly Creek Elementary School, Primrose School at Stapleton, Creative Learning Preschool- Denver, Northfield High School, The Goddard School, High Tech Elementary School and Denver Discovery School

Local Parks:
Westerly Creek Park, Puddle Jumper Park, Arc Park, Bouquet Park, Cherry Pie Park, Rumble Park, Sharp Park, Central Park and rec center, Winter Park, Autumn Park, Summer Park, Spring Park, Arrowhead Park, Yosak Pocket Park, Fred Thomas Park, Founder Green, GreenWay Park, Sharpetz Park, Stapleton Off-Leash Park, Constellation Park, Rolling Bluff Park, Pea Pod Park, Cottonwood Clearing Park, Lifted Meadow Park, Willow Basin Park, Willow Park East Dog Park, Harvest Park, Conservatory Green, Pocket Park, Northfield Pond Park, The Green (North), Bluff Lake Nature Center, Runway 35 Park, Quilted Park, Sand Creek Regional Greenway, Smith Road Trailhead, *Aviator Park and Pool, *F-15 Pool in Stapleton and *Jet Stream Pool

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
The RTD A light rail stops at Central Park Station.

Busses servicing the neighborhood (including service from Central Park Station): 28, 34, 37, 42, 43, 62, 65, 73, 88, 89 and 105

Bike Lanes in the neighborhood include: D2 (Smith Rd. & E. 47th Ave.), D21 (Central Park Blvd.), D8 (Montview Blvd.), D19 (Syracuse St.), D6 (E. 29th Ave.), D6-A ( E. 26th Ave. through Greenway Belt Park) and Havana Street

Multi-use trails: Sand Creek Greenway Trail, Westerly Creek Trail, Northfield Pond Park and two in Central Park

Resources for Annual Events:
Stapleton Master Community Association: http://www.stapletoncommunity.com


“Our Story”
Stapleton Denver: Community
http://history.denverlibrary.org/capitol-hill-neighborhood-history

Web.6/2017

“Stapleton International Airport”
Stapleton International Airport: Articles
https://coloradoencyclopedia.org/article/stapleton-international-airport
Copyright 2016, Colorado Encyclopedia. Web.6/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

Athmar Park

Neighborhood Profile: Athmar Park

Athmar Park History:

Athmar Park originally started out as a few independent parcels. The northeast portion was rural farmland at the turn of the 20th century. A majority of those farms were wheat fields and celery farms. The eastern border was once part of what is now the Valverde neighborhood. And the northwest part of the land was orginally a neighborhood called Mountain View Park.

Athmar Park

Starting in 1902 portions of these lands were incrementally annexed by Denver, starting with the eastern edge. These small annexations continued for more than 30 years. One of the last parcels annexed was Mountain View Park in 1943. The land changed hands three different times before being auctioned and sold to John and Thomas McCusker in 1946. The two brothers developed the land as a Denver subdivision named “Athmar Park.” Supposedly the name originated as a combination of Athea and Mary, the names of the brothers’ two wives.

Athmar Park Today:

Athmar-Park
Athmar Park is one of the most affordable neighborhoods in Denver. A majority of the homes were built in the mid- 20th century, but there are the still original 1880s brick style homes and also bungalows from the 20’s and 30s in the old Mountain View Park area. Neighbors take pride in their community involvement and love the many local parks.

Where:
Athmar Park is bounded by Federal Boulevard to the west, South Platte River to the east, W. Alameda Avenue to the north, and W. Mississippi Avenue to the south.

Who Lives There:
The population is 44% single, 35% married and 28% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 20.29%

Retail Areas:
Federal Boulevard
Alameda Avenue
Jason Street
Mississippi Avenue

Median Sales Price:
$288,000 for a single family residence (2017)

Main Attractions:
Afforable area to buy a home and strong community involvement

Common Complaints:
Higher percentage of petty crime compared to other Denver neighborhoods and not enough casual retail (i.e. drug stores)

Schools:
St. Rose of Lima School
KIPP Sunshine Peak Academy
KIPP Denver Collegiate School
Goldrick Elementary School

Local Parks:
Vanderbilt Park
Habitat Park
Aspgren Park
Huston Lake Park
South Platte River Trail

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Buses servicing the area are the 11, 3, 14, 4, 30, 30L, 31, and 36L

The South Platte River Trail is a multi-purpose trail and bike path. Shared lane bicycle routes are the D7 (S. Jason Street) and D5 (Zuni Street).

Resources:
Anthmar Park Neighborhood Association: http://athmarpark.com
Athmar Park


“About Athmar Park”
Athmar Park Neighborhood Association
http://athmarpark.com/athmarpark/

5/2017

“Athmar Park”
Community Facts: Neighborhood Summaries
http://denvermetrodata.org/neighborhood/athmar-park
Copyright 1998, The Piton Foundation. Web.5/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

Whittier

Whittier - Manual High SchoolNeighborhood Profile: Whittier

Whittier History:

The Whittier neighborhood was one of the first neighborhoods to extend beyond the bounds of Denver’s original Congressional Grant. The neighborhood was named after a local school. The school was named in honor of the nineteenth-century abolitionist poet, John Greenleaf Whittier. Whittier wrote about the injustices of slavery and questioned the hypocrisy of a nation founded on freedom. In the early 20th century Denver put restrictive housing covenants and color lines in place. African Americans had to live within the boundary lines of Whittier and Five Points.

Segregation did not stop residence from pushing to make their lives and circumstances better. One example, is that of Marie A. Greenwood. Greenwood was hired by Denver schools as the city’s first African-American teacher. She was under a three-year probation period. No other black teachers could be hired until she passed this probation. Her success gave many African-Americans the opportunity to be teachers in the school district. By the 1950’s housing restrictions had been ruled unconstitutional. Although people in the community were moving to new suburbs and neighborhoods like Park Hill, many chose to stay in Whittier.

Whittier Today:

The many fine craftsman that once lived here left a legacy of great architectural styles. The Whittier neighborhood still boasts many victorian homes with ornate details. There are many parks with wide streets and larger lots. The neighborhood is very diverse and more young families are moving in every year.

Where:
Whitter is bounded by Downing Street to the west, York Street to the east, East 31st Avenue to the north, and East 23rd Avenue to the south

Who Lives There:
The population is 48% single, 31% married and 21% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover in 24.26%.

Retail Areas:
Race Street
Downing Street

Median Sales Price:
$484,000 for  a single family home (2017)

Main Attractions:
A diverse population, great architecture and close to downtown

Common Complaints:
High crime rate compared to other Denver neighborhoods

Schools:
St. Elizabeths School
Manual High School
Whittier K-8 School

Local Parks:
Fuller Park/ Fuller Dog Park
George Morrison Sr. Park
Dr. Daniel Hale Williams Park
Madame CJ Walker Park
Frederick Douglass Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
The RTD D line Light Rail stops at 30th and Downing

The Buses that service Whittier are the 12, 32, 34, 24, 43, and 28

Shared lane bicycle routes are the D6 (E. 29th Ave.) and D11 (Lafayette Street and Franklin ). There is a designated bike lane on E. 31st Avenue.

Whittier


“History of the Whittier Neighborhood”
Whittier Neighborhood Association

http://www.whittierneighborhood.org/whittier-neighborhood-association/history-whittier-neighborhood
5/2017

”Five Points- Whittier Neighborhood History”Denver Public Library: Neighborhood History Guides https://history.denverlibrary.org/five-points-whittier-neighborhood-history
5/2017

Cory-Merrill

Cory-MerrillNeighborhood Profile: Cory-Merril

Cory-Merrill History:

The Cory-Merrill neighborhood was originally named Coronado by S. Allen and Henrietta Long. The couple platted the land in 1883. Coronado was then part of the town of South Denver. The Long family, with help from John Babcock, persuaded school district #35 to open an academy in their area. Babcock was instrumental in the development of the University Park neighborhood and by 1886 he had erected the Coronado School. Babcock would also serve as the head of the school board but the Coronado school would start to fade by 1904.

At the turn of the century the neighborhood was annexed to Denver. A majority of the land was farms and orchards. In 1906 St. Thomas Aquinas Theological Seminary was founded on 60 acres of land. Backers of the seminary liked the fact that it was so secluded with a lot of open space. Sponsors hoped it would “restore the health of those aspiring to the priesthood” and “redress the way tuberculosis ravished many hopeful theologians.”

In the 1940’s, farmland was donated to Denver Public Schools by Mr. Armstrong. To replace aging facilities, the school district built Cory Elementary and Merrill Junior High School. Both schools were named after influential Denver educators, John J. Cory and Louise A. Merrill. Developer, Les Tremblay purchased plots around the school at the same time. He built tract homes to house soldiers coming home from WWII. The single story homes became known as, Les Tremblay small houses. Soon after the neighborhood would become the Cory-Merrill neighborhood.

Cory-Merrill Today:

Cory-Merrill is one of the most sought after neighborhoods in Denver and has become quite popular with young families. The seminary is still thriving and the namesake schools, still going strong. Many of the Les Tremblay houses have been scrapped for larger and more modern homes.

Cory-Merrill

Where:
Cory- Merrill is bounded by E. Mississippi Avenue to the north, I-25 to the south, S. University Boulevard to the west, and S. Colorado Boulevard to the east.

Who Lives There:
The population is 48% single, 37% married, and 21% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 28.13%.

Retail Areas:
Colorado Boulevard

Median Sales Price:
$743,000 for a single family home (2017)

Main Attractions:
A quiet neighborhood, close to the light rail, close to Washington Park, strong community involvement

Common Complaints:
Cory Merrill is one of the most expensive neighborhoods in Denver

Schools:
Cory Elemetary School
Merrill Middle School
College America
St. Vincent De Paul School
Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missonary Seminary

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Buses servicing the neighborhood: 11 (Mississippi Avenue), 24 (University Blvd.), and 40 (Colorado Blvd.)

There are three shared bicycle routes: D13 (Steele Street), D18 (Florida Avenue), and D16 (Mississippi Avenue)

Annual Events & Resources:
Lights of Love “Luminaria” (Nov./Dec.)

Cory Merrill Neighborhood Association: http://www.corymerrill.org

Cory-Merrill


Phil Goodstein. The History of South Denver: The Haunts of Washington Park
Published by New Social Publications, Denver, CO.
2009. Print.

“Cory-Merrill Neighborhood History”
Cory Merrill Neighborhood Association
http://www.corymerrill.org/wp-content/uploads/cmn_takreda_allred_history.pdf
Copyright 1998, The Piton Foundation. Web.6/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

North Park Hill

Neighborhood Profile: North Park Hill

North Park Hill History:

 A Prussian German named Baron Allois Guillaume Eugen Von Winckler is credited as “the father of Park Hill.” He purchased the plot of land that is now South Park Hill and platted it, “Park Hill” in 1885. Winckler died thirteen years later and upon his death investors bought the Park Hill holdings. The original land owned by the Baron was annexed to Denver in 1893, while land composing the greater Park Hill (North Park Hill and Northeast Park Hill) was added ten years later.

Vintage North Park Hill

Investors construction efforts were focused mostly in the South Park Hill Area. Post WW II however, there was a housing shortage in Denver. Park Hill developers built more homes to accommodate this growth. You can see this with the majority of modest mid century homes in North Park Hill. The U.S. Supreme Court also ruled that housing restrictions were unenforceable.  African American families were moving to North Park Hill from neighborhoods like Five Points. Initially the neighborhood experienced “white flight.” There were new and old time residents however, that wanted to make integration work. In 1972 the City of Denver divided Park Hill into three sections. As a result much of New Park Hill became what in now, North Park Hill.

North Park Hill Today:

The America Planning Association declared Park Hill among the top ten “great places to live in America” in 2008. With quiet streets, cute mid-century brick homes, and the strong community involvement, North Park Hill just seems to get better with each passing year.

North Park Hill

Where: 
North Park Hill is bounded by Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to the north, East 23rd Avenue to the south, Colorado Boulevard to the west, and Quebec Street to the east.

Who lives there:
Married couples make up a majority of the neighborhood (over 40%), 35% are single, and children are in 25% of the households. Annual Residential Turnover is almost 16%.

Retail Areas:
Colorado Boulevard
Quebec Street

Median Sales Price:
$492,000 for a single family residence (2017)

Main Attractions: 
Strong community involvement, large sized lots

Common Complaints:
No retail or restaurants within the neighborhood

Schools:
Montessori Children’s House of Denver
Smiley Middle School
Stedman Elementary School
Hallett Science and Tech Academy

Local Parks:
Thomas Earnest McClain Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Bus Lines that run along and through the neighborhood include the 28, 28B, 40, 43, 20, 65, and 73.

MLK Boulevard has a designated bike Lane. Shared lane bike routes in the area include the D15, D6, and the D17.

North Park Hill Home


Goodstein, Phil. Park Hill Promise: The Quest for an Idyllic Denver Neighborhood.
New Social Publications. Denver, CO, 2012. Print.

“Park Hill Neighborhood History”
Denver Public Library: Neighborhood History Guides
http://history.denverlibrary.org/park-hill-neighborhood-history

Web.4/2017

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

University Neighborhood Denver

Neighborhood Profile: University

University Neighborhood Denver History:

The University neighborhood Denver owes much of its history to Denver University. John Evans founded the school as Colorado Seminary in 1864. The name changed to the University of Denver in 1880. Just a few years later the school was outgrowing its original site at Fourteenth and Arapahoe Street. The board of trustees accepted an offer of 150 acres southeast to move and expand.

Denver_University

There were conditions to this offer; the land had to be laid out on a street grid with trees planted. Most notable, no alcohol could be made or sold in the area. Gifts of land and cash helped the University holdings increase to almost 500 acres.  At the time University was part of the incorporated town of South Denver. Nearly ten years later the silver crash of 1893 would cause citizens to approve annexation into the City and County of Denver.

The population boomed in University after WW II, very similar to other Denver neighborhoods. Veterans stationed in Colorado decided to relocate permanently. Using GI Bills, many attended DU. The school became known as “GI Tech.” The federal government generously provided funding for construction of permanent housing in the area.

University Today:

A majority of the population continue to be college students. Close to mass transit, it’s very easy to get around the city. There are still many of the original mid-century brick homes but modern contemporary, new style craftsman and a few victorian styles can also be found.

University neighborhood Denver

Where:
University is bounded by South Downing Street to the west, South University Boulevard to the east, I-25 to the north, and East Amherst Avenue/ East Dartmouth Avenue to the south

Who Lives There:
The population is 48% single, 37% married, and 19% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 27%.

Retail Areas:
Evans Avenue
University Boulevard
Downing Street

Median Sales Price:
$535,000 for a single family home (2017),  $505,000 (condo) and $545,000 (for a detached family residence)

Main Attractions:
Close to Denver University, many parks, and the RTD Light Rail.

Common Complaints:
Many of the homes in the area are used as rentals for college students.

Schools:
University of Denver
Asbury Elementary Schoo
Colorado Women’s College
University of Denver High School
The Joshua School
Illif School of Theology
St. Anne’s Episcopal School

Local Parks:
De Boer Park
Harvard Gulch Trail
Carnegie Green
Harper Humanities Gardens
Harvard Gulch Mini Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
The E, F, and H RTD Light Rail Lines stop in the neighborhood

The buses that service the neighborhood are the 24, 21, 12, and 27

Shared lane bicycle routes are the D22 (Dartmouth Ave.), D11 (Franklin St.), and D20 (Iliff Ave.) The Harvard Gulch trail is a multi- use trail


Fisher, Steve. A Brief History of South Denver & University Park.
Published by The History Press. Charleston, SC, 2012. Print.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

Globeville

Neighborhood Profile: Globeville

Globeville History:

Globeville’s land was originally purchased by the Globe Smelting and Refining Company in the late 1880’s. Just like today, the area was primarily industrial. The neighborhood included the smelt plant, other packing plants and the railroads. These three industries were a big draw for people looking for employment. Globeville became its own incorporated town by 1891, just two years after it was orginally platted. The City and County of Denver annexed the 448 acres in 1902.

Globeville has always been isolated from the rest of Denver. In the early years it was the South Platte River and the railroads that caused these barrires. Limited transportation would also disconnect Globeville from other areas of Denver and influence many Globeville workers and their families to become residents of the neighborhood. The constrution of Interstate 25 and Interstate 70 in the mid-20th century would increase the  impact of this isolation. The two major interstates overlap and connect in the center of Globeville, bisecting the neighborhood. Sadly, the construction of the interstates meant the demolishment of over 30 homes. This had a huge impact on many long time residents.

Globeville Today:

The neighborhood is still primarily zoned for, and dominated by industry. There is limited room for residential expansion, therefore there are very few homes available. Globeville is currently feeling the impact of the Interstate 70 expansion project, which will certainly alter the neighborhood yet again. The neighborhood is secluded but residents enjoy being 20 blocks from downtown and extremely close to both freeways.

Globeville

Where:
Globeville is bounded by Inca Stree to the west, the South Platte River to the east, and East 52nd and East 56th Avenues to the north.

Who Lives There:
Singles and married couple are almost to equally split with 34% of the households having children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 21%.

Retail Areas:
Wasington Street
Broadway
Fox Street

Median Sales Price:
$255,500 (2017), $341,000 (condo) and 233,000 for a single family residence

Main Attractions:
Immediate access to I-25 and I-70, it is one of the most affordable neighborhoods in Denver

Common Complaints:
Too secluded, almost no retail or dining

Schools:
Garden Place Elementary
Open Air Academy

Local Parks:
Heron Pond/ Heller Open Space
Northside Park
City of Cuernavaca Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Two of Denver’s major Highways intersect here. The bus lines for I-25 are the 39L, 90, 80L, 120X and 122X. The bus lines for I-70 are the 55L and 72L. The 8 and 12 lines also run through the neighborhood.

The South Platte River Trail is a multi purose trail. East 47th ave. and East 45th ave. are both designated bike lane routes.

Art Venues and Annual Events:
Golbeville Riverfront Arts Center

Globeville


“Globeville”
Community Facts: Neighborhood Summaries
http://denvermetrodata.org/neighborhood/globeville
Copyright 1998, The Piton Foundation. Web.4/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

East Colfax

Neighborhood Profile: East Colfax

East Colfax History:

In the late 1850’s gold prospectors and settlers would travel west to Denver over a branch of the Smoky Hill Trail. This trail connected the smaller town of Denver to the nearest big city in the east. Soon the trail would become known as the Kansas City Road. In 1896, to honor Schuyler Colfax, vice-president to President Ulysses S. Grant, the road was renamed Colfax Avenue. The surrounding neighborhood east of Quebec Street was named East Colfax.

The East Colfax neighborhood had a scattering of homes and businesses by the 1870’s. In the late 1890’s developers built many apartments along East Colfax, much to the dismay of nearby upscale neighborhoods. This didn’t last long however as eventually it was decided to eliminate all residential building on Colfax. Developers felt it was, “destined to evolve into a commercial corridor,” which it most certainly did. The neighborhoods of Montclair, East Colfax and (what is now) the neighborhood of Lowry were all annexed to Denver in 1902.

Development came slowly for the East Colfax neighborhood, but in time industry was built close by and as a result the neighborhood began to change. Stapleton Air Field opened to the north and less than a decade later Lowry Air Force Base was established to the south. New housing was built to accomodate the growing number of workers from these two facilities. By the 1950’s East Colfax Avenue had a string of motels, hotels, restaurants and gas stations. The establishments were catering to visitors heading towards the Rocky Mountains and travelers going East. Colfax Avenue was the main route through Denver in both directions until the mid 1960’s, when Interstate 70 was opened.

East Colfax Today:

Today East Colfax is a neighborhood in transition. Most properties still have their original early to mid-century style homes, while a few lots are being turned over with new builds. Close to retail and restaurants, East Colfax is also one of Denver’s most affordable neighborhoods. 

East Colfax

Where: 
East Colfax is bound by Quebec Street to the west, Yosemite Street to the east, Montview Boulevard to the north, East 11th Avenue to the south, and East 23rd Avenue to the north (between Quebec Street and Syracuse Street.)

Who lives there: 
Married couples make up about 45% of the population, singles about 38% with 25% of households having children. The Annual Residential Turnover is about 22%.

Retail Areas:
East Colfax Avenue

Median Sales Price: 
$299,000 for a single family home in 2017.

Main Attractions: 
Affordable compared to many other Denver neighborhoods. There are many casual bars, restaurants, and coffee shops close by.

Common Complaints:
High crime compared to other neighborhoods, with a greater percentage of renters to owners

Schools: 
Ashley Elementary School

Local Parks: 
Verbena Park and 
McNichols Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes: 
The buses in the neighborhood run along the main streets. These routes include, 15 L on East Colfax, 10 on 11th Avenue, 20 on Montview, and 73 on Quebec Street.

Bike lanes in the neighborhood include the D10, D8, and D21 regional bike routes, shared bike lanes on East 12th Avenue, Syracuse Street, and Yosemite Street. 

East Colfax


“East Colfax Avenue Neighborhood History”
Denver Public Library: Neighborhood History Guides
http://history.denverlibrary.org/east-colfax-neighborhood-history

3/2017

“East Colfax”
Community Facts: Neighborhood Summaries
http://denvermetrodata.org/neighborhood/east-colfax
Copyright 1998, The Piton Foundation. Web.4/2017.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

University Park

Neighborhood Profile: University Park

University Park History:

University Park owes much of its history to it’s proximity to the University of Denver. The school was originally founded as Colorado Seminary by John Evans in 1864. However, in 1880 the school added the name the University of Denver. Just a few years later the school outgrew its original site at Fourteenth and Arapahoe Street. Consequently, the board of trustees accepted an offer of 150 acres southeast in which to move the university and expand.

University Park
Chamberlain Observatory

There were conditions to this offer however, most notably that no alcohol could be made or sold in the area. Gifts of land and cash helped the University holdings increase to almost 500 acres. The University of Denver trustees then platted 399 acres in University Park and sold those lots to benefit the university. University Park was part of the incorporated town of South Denver and by the mid 1890’s South Denver had several hundred residents. Only about a dozen residents were actually living in University Park and ten years later the silver crash of 1893 would contribute to causing citizens of University Park to approve annexation into the City and County of Denver.

University Park experienced a population boom after WW II when veterans stationed in Colorado decided to make Denver their permanent home. Using GI Bills many attended Denver University and the school received the nickname, “GI Tech.” In the following ten years many of the current homes were built resulting in an average build date of 1955.

University Park Today:

University park is still a strongly desirable place to live because of the beautiful homes on large lots, big established trees, low crime, and gorgeous parks. All of these features add to the charm of this Denver neighborhood.

University Park

Where: 
University Park is bounded by University Boulevard to the west, South Colorado Boulevard to the east, Interstate 25 to the north, and East Yale Way to the south.

Who Lives There: 
Singles make up almost half the population, married couples are 37% with 19% of the households having children. Annual Residential Turnover is 27%.

Retail Areas:
Colorado Boulevard
University Boulevard

Median Sales Price: 
$597,500 ( 2017). Average home prices range between $382,000 (for a condo) to a $825,000 for a single-family home.

Main Attractions: 
Properties are kept up well by owners, the neighborhood is very pedestrian and bicycle friendly

Common Complaints:
Restaurants and retail close early (including weekends), recent construction is hindering parking and driving in areas

Schools:
Most Precious Blood Catholic School
Accelerated Schools (Private)
Parzival Shield (Preschool)
Buchtel Bungalow University

Local Parks: 
Robert H. McWilliams Park, 
Observatory Park, and 
Prairie Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes: 
The E,H, and F RTD Light Rail Lines run through University Park. The stops to get on however, are over the boundry lines in the University and Virginia Village neighborhoods.

Bus lines servicing the neighborhood include the 21, 24, 27, 40, and the 46

University Park has four regional shared bike routes: D11, D13, D18, and D20. The East Harvard Gulch Trail is a multi- use trail. Designated bike lanes run most of E. Buchtel Blvd. and part of E. Yale Avenue

Popular Events:
Neighborhood Garage Sale (June)
Forth of July Parade
Band in the Park followed by stargazing
Sing & Sleigh-bells

University Park


Fisher, Steve. Images of America: University Park and South Denver.
Published by Arcadia Publishing. Charleston, South Carolina, 2009. Print.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

South Park Hill

Neighborhood Profile: South Park Hill

South Park Hill History:

Speculators purchased most of South Park Hill from the federal government in the 1860’s. It was Prussian German, Baron Allois Guillaume Eugen Von Winckler, however, who’s credited as “the father of Park Hill.” Winckler came to Denver in 1884 at the age of 25 and soon after was introduced to Walter Von Richthofen. Richthofen was one of the investors of the town of Montclair. Winckler decided to invest in land close to Montclair and purchased a plot east of Colorado Boulevard, between 26th Avenue and Montview in 1885. He platted the land “Park Hill” and envisioned the property with grand homes on oversized lots. A large number of people were moving to the Denver area and Winckler was hoping to profit from this boom. The silver crash of 1893 helped contribute to slow sales in Park Hill. Consequently, Winckler took his own life in 1898.

South Park Hill
Montview Blvd

Soon after investors bought the Park Hill holdings. They really started to flesh out Park Hill as an idyllic and affluent residential neighborhood. The original land owned by the Baron was annexed to Denver in 1893 while the rest of the land composing greater Park Hill was added ten years later. Varying styles of homes were built throughout the 1920’s and 30’s. In addition, automobiles were becoming popular at this time. Therefore homes were built with detached garages to accommodate this craze.

Post WW II Denver experienced a housing shortage. Park Hill developers built more homes to accommodate the new growth. The U.S. Supreme Court also ruled that housing restrictions were unenforceable. Residents of other Denver neighborhood sought to make South Park Hill their home. In 1972 the City of Denver divided Park Hill into three sections. As a result much of Old Park Hill became what is now South Park Hill.

South Park Hill Today:

The America Planning Association declared Park Hill among the top ten “great places to live in America” in 2008. This statement still holds true today. South Park Hill is a quiet community, with beautiful old homes, lovely tree lined streets and strong community involvement.

South Park Hill

Where: 
South Park Hill is bounded by East 23rd Avenue to the north, East Colfax Avenue to the south, Colorado Boulevard to the west, and Quebec Street to the east.

Who lives there: 
Married couples make up close to 45% of the neighborhood, singles 38%, and 25% of the households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover in almost 22%.

Retail Areas:
Colfax Avenue
Kearney Street (between 22nd and 23rd)
Oneida Street (between 22nd and 23rd)

Median Sales Price: 
$602,000 for a single family residence (2017)

Main Attractions: 
Beautiful old homes and a family oriented atmosphere.

Common Complaints: 
Lack of upscale restaurants and retail, one of the most expensive neighborhoods to buy a home.

Schools: 
Denver School of the Arts,
Johnson & Wales University
Montview Community Preschool and Kindergarten
Odyssey School of Denver

Local Parks: 
W.H. Ferguson Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes: 
Bus lines that run the parameter are the 65, 40, 20, RC, 15, and 15L

South Park Hill has a designated bike route (D8) along Montview Boulevard and the D15 and D17 that are shared bike lanes

Art Venues and Popular Events:
Sweet Studios
Annual 4th of July Parade
Park Hill Home Tour and Street Fair (every September)

South Park Hill


Goodstein, Phil. Park Hill Promise: The Quest for an Idyllic Denver Neighborhood.
New Social Publications. Denver, CO, 2012. Print.

“Park Hill Neighborhood History”
Denver Public Library: Neighborhood History Guides
http://history.denverlibrary.org/park-hill-neighborhood-history

Web.4/2017

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.

Sloan Lake

Sloan Lake

Sloan Lake

Sloan Lake History:

Thomas Sloan and his wife Sarah staked claim to 160 acres of what is now the Sloan Lake neighborhood in 1862. The Ohio couple moved to Denver in 1959, and ran a bar and boarding house on Larimer Street. The lake did not actually exist on the original homestead. Rumor has it that Mr. Sloan dug a well and woke up the next day to a growing lake. He hit a gusher of a natural spring, ultimately covering 200 acres. Now Sloan Lake is the biggest lake in Denver.

Before his death, Sloan platted the area “Lakeville.” In 1881 an amusement park, Manhattan Beach, opened on the north shore of the lake. It featured hot air ballon rides, elephant rides, boating attractions, a dance hall, a roller coaster and more. The park burned down in 1908, replaced later that year with Luna Park. That amusement park closed six years later after great completion from Elitch Gardens and Lakeside Amusement Park.

Sloan Lake Today:

Sloan Lake is the second largest park in Denver. Attracting many people it boasts, bicycle and jogging paths, boating, fishing, basketball courts, and picnic areas. A scenic neighborhood, it also has an amazing view of the Rocky Mountains.

Sloan Lake

Where:
Sloan Lake is bounded by Sheridan Boulevard to the west, Federal Boulevard to the east, West 29th Avenue to the north, and West 17th and 19th Avenues to the south.

Who Lives There:
48% are single, 33% are married, and 21% of households have children. The Annual Residential Turnover is 19.84%

Retail Areas:
Sheridan Boulevard
Federal Boulevard
West 29th Aveenue

Median Sales Price:
$482,500 for a single family home (2017). Home prices range on average from  $447,000 (condo) to $595,000 (for a detached family home).

Main Attractions:
Sloan Lake and Park (the park covers half the neighborhood), close to downtown but still quiet and relaxing. 

Common Complaints:
Parking can be hard to find in certain areas, many mordern oversize homes are replacing the quaint victorians.

Schools:
Brown Elementary School

Local Parks:
Sloan Lake/ Sloan’s Lake Park
Cooper Lake
Hallack Park
Osceola & 29th Park

Public Transportation and Bike Lanes:
Mass transit is primarily buses running the prameter of the neighborhood. The lines include, 28, 28B, 31, 20, 50, and 51.

D6 is a designated bike lane along 24th Avenue that turns into a shared bike lane route. D8 is a designated bike lane along 17th avenue. Running the peramater of Sloan Lake is an off street trail. D1 is a shared bike lane route.

Art Venues and Popular Events:
Denver Sloan’s Lake Art and Music Festival

Sloan Lake


Goodstein, Phil. Northside Story: Denver’s Most Intriguing Neighborhood.
New Social Publications. Denver, CO, 2011. Print.

Statistical data collected from Metrolist, Inc. RE Colorado – powered by Matrix.